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Did You Know?

  • Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death for teenagers, ahead of all other types of injury, violence, or disease.1
  • Every day, six teenagers are killed in a motor vehicle crash in the U.S.1
  • In 2015, teenagers 15-19 years of age accounted for 66% of motor vehicle deaths among children ages 19 and under in the U.S.2
  • In 2015, teenagers 15-19 years of age accounted for 96% of motor vehicle deaths among children ages 19 and under in Georgia.3
  • Nationwide, 10% of teenage drivers reported driving after drinking alcohol within the past 30 days.1
  • 41% of teenage drivers surveyed in 2013 said they had texted or emailed while driving in the past 30 days.1
  • 31% of high school teenagers report it is likely that they or their friends will be under the influence of drugs or alcohol sometime during prom or graduation season.4
  • 87% of teenagers believe their peers are likely to drive impaired instead of calling their parent or guardian for help because they are afraid of getting in trouble.4
  • 30% of teenagers know other teenagers who have gotten DUIs for impaired driving.4

AAA Promise

Prom season 2017 has arrived and Safe Kids Georgia wanted to make it a safe one for Hillgrove High School students. On Tuesday, April 18, 2017, a few of our staff members visited Hillgrove High School in Powder Springs to support AAA PROMise; a program offered by the Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation to reduce the number of youth under the age of 21 killed in alcohol or drug-related car crashes. An emphasis is placed on prom through graduation season (March – June) because this is typically when many car crashes occur. During Hillgrove’s 3-hour lunch block, our Program Coordinator and Intern talked with juniors and seniors about the dangers of distracted driving as well as impaired driving. Stations were set up to address dangerous driving behaviors and situations. Students practiced driving on a simulator and wore “drunk” goggles to see how drinking affects reaction time. Moreover, students were given educational materials and promotional items that communicated how to stay safe between prom and grad night by avoiding the dangers of impaired driving. Lastly, students were encouraged to take the AAA PROMise safe driving pledge. By taking the AAA PROMise pledge, teens committed to making the right decision when it comes to underage drinking, drugs, and impaired driving:

  • I promise not to drink alcohol or take drugs.
  • I promise not to drive impaired.
  • I promise not to let my friends drive impaired.
  • I promise my parents I will get home safely.

The pledge reinforces the parent-teen relationship by encouraging teens to talk to their parents about the dangers of underage drinking, illegal drug use, and impaired driving. This includes having a plan for a safe way home during prom and graduation season. Should the teen be in danger of driving impaired or riding with someone who may be impaired, parents can pick their teen up and AAA will tow the family car home free of charge. Events like these give students firsthand experience of what impaired driving can do and allows students to make good judgements when they’re in real life situations and faced with tough decisions.

AAA Promise

 

References

  1. Safe Kids Worldwide (2016). Motor Vehicle Safety Fact Sheet. Retrieved from https://www.safekids.org/sites/default/files/documents/skw_motor_vehicle_fact_sheet_2016_final.pdf
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Atlanta, GA: Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/injury/wisqars.
  3. Georgia Department of Public Health, Office of Health Indicators for Planning. Online Analytical Statistical Information System (OASIS). Retrieved from https://oasis.state.ga.us.
  4. Auto Club Group Traffic Safety Foundation. Make the AAA Promise. Retrieved from https://autoclubsouth.aaa.com/safety/aaapromise.aspx
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